DHA supplementation improves cognition in older adults with mild cognitive impairment

DHA, the long form of Omega-3, is well known for its effect on brain health. Omega-6 competes with omega-3 for position in cell membranes, so to maximize the effect of omega-3, you need to reduce the intake of omega-6.

ClinicalNews.Org

Public Release: 11-Oct-2016

Chinese study shows improved IQ with omega-3 supplementation

GOED

Results from a recent study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease support the cognitive benefits of DHA, which have been consistently demonstrated with doses of 900 mg/day or greater. The study, which took place in Tianjin, China, was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 240 (219 completed) Chinese individuals aged 65 and older with mild cognitive impairment. The participants received either 2g/day of DHA or a corn oil placebo for 12 months and specific measures of cognitive function were measured at baseline, six months and 12 months.

The study results showed that there was a significant difference in the Full-Scale Intelligence Quotient (IQ) in the DHA group versus placebo, with IQ in the DHA group measuring 10% higher than the placebo group. Additionally, there were statistically significant increases in two IQ sub-tests (Information and Digit Span). The…

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Omega-3 fatty acid stops known trigger of lupus

I know how much this helped me with my Arthritis (AS)–I am sure it will help with Lupus patients if they can reduce their omega-6/3 ratio. It really is almost like a miracle to me.

ClinicalNews.Org

Date:
September 29, 2016
Source:
Michigan State University
Summary:
Consuming an omega-3 fatty acid called DHA, or docosahexaenoic acid, can stop a known trigger of lupus and potentially other autoimmune disorders, researchers have discovered.

FULL STORY


A team of Michigan State University researchers has found that DHA, or docosahexaenoic acid, can stop a known trigger of lupus. Pictured left to right: Doctoral student Melissa Bates, Department of Food and Human Nutrition, University Distinguished Professor Jack Harkema, College of Veterinary Medicine and University Distinguished Professor James Pestka, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Photo:

Credit: G.L Kohuth

A team of Michigan State University researchers has found that consuming an omega-3 fatty acid called DHA, or docosahexaenoic acid, can stop a known trigger of lupus and potentially other autoimmune disorders.

DHA can be found in fatty, cold-water fish and is produced by the algae that fish eat and store in their…

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